Salmon Patties

Bender

Administering the BS
#1
Now who doesn't love salmon patties?

Only problem I have with them, is most people tend to fry them... yuck... all that grease !!

You would figure if people were smart enough to buy a healthy food such as salmon, they would be smart enough to cook it in a healthy way.

Friends... I have a healthy way.... I bake mine.


The recipe is pretty basic, no surprises here


  • 1 can of salmon
  • 1 can of tuna
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 small onion (diced)
  • 1 pkg of crackers (smashed).

In a nutshell, preheat oven to 350, drain (but save) the juice from the salmon and tuna, flake the salmon and remove the bones, add tuna, eggs, onion, and crackers. mix it all up till it's well blended together... if it seems a tad dry, add a bit of the leftover salmon/tuna juice.

Shape into patties, you should get 6 of them, and place on a non stick baking sheet that has been lightly sprayed with a bit of Pam™ or other type of cooking spray.

Bake for 15 minutes, then turn over and bake for another 10 or so.

I like to serve them with AuGratin potatoes myself.
.
.
 

Ali

Eschew obfuscation
#6
I love salmon, but I just can't seem to bring myself to love salmon patties. The thought of salmon in a can just turns my stomach.

I'm weird like that.
 

RoyalOrleans

I Am Not the Fine Man You Take Me For
#7
Ali said:
I love salmon, but I just can't seem to bring myself to love salmon patties. The thought of salmon in a can just turns my stomach.

I'm weird like that.
I grew up eating salmon patties, made from the Double Q canned variety, and I've got a smooth shiny coat from it.

I'm with you now. Not digging on things from a can. The occasional Coca Cola, maybe twice a year, but nothing I eat comes from a can. Blah!
 

Bender

Administering the BS
#8
RoyalOrleans said:
Since when is there tuna in my salmon patties?
Very good question... and the answer is: The recipe comes from being poor. Not everyone can afford salmon, and to improvise and add to to mass when feeding several people, tuna is a great filler/substitute. You could of course make it without the tuna.

The only reason I listed tuna in MY recipe, is because that is how I was taught. There are tons of salmon patty recipe's out there. ;)
.
.
 

Ali

Eschew obfuscation
#9
My mom wasn't the greatest or most adventurous cook in the world, so I grew up eating everything out of a can. I'll still eat some canned soups and I do use Prego spaghetti sauce as a base for my sauces though I doctor it up a lot, but pretty much everything else I eat now is homemade if I can help it.

I do like the tuna that comes in the foil packets vs. the cans. It seems fresher to me and works well for tuna salad sandwiches.
 

Ali

Eschew obfuscation
#10
Bender said:
Very good question... and the answer is: The recipe comes from being poor. Not everyone can afford salmon, and to improvise and add to to mass when feeding several people, tuna is a great filler/substitute. You could of course make it without the tuna.

The only reason I listed tuna in MY recipe, is because that is how I was taught. There are tons of salmon patty recipe's out there. ;)
.
.
lol @ "poor recipes". I hear ya there.
 

RoyalOrleans

I Am Not the Fine Man You Take Me For
#12
Bender said:
Very good question... and the answer is: The recipe comes from being poor. Not everyone can afford salmon, and to improvise and add to to mass when feeding several people, tuna is a great filler/substitute. You could of course make it without the tuna.

The only reason I listed tuna in MY recipe, is because that is how I was taught. There are tons of salmon patty recipe's out there. ;)
.
.
Awww... I'm all teary-eyed. Merry Christmas!
 

RoyalOrleans

I Am Not the Fine Man You Take Me For
#13
Ali said:
I do like the tuna that comes in the foil packets vs. the cans. It seems fresher to me and works well for tuna salad sandwiches.
I had to send a link to Emkay a few days back to show her what the foil packets look like. I'd reckon that Canadian supermarkets are completely devoid of America's most convenient food.

I buy those tuna and salmon foil packets with ever increasing frequency. It's a quick, cheap lunch. I eat it straight from the pack, though. No nasty mayo... blah!
 
#14
RoyalOrleans said:
I had to send a link to Emkay a few days back to show her what the foil packets look like. I'd reckon that Canadian supermarkets are completely devoid of America's most convenient food.

I buy those tuna and salmon foil packets with ever increasing frequency. It's a quick, cheap lunch. I eat it straight from the pack, though. No nasty mayo... blah!
Ahhh bite me! I hate fukking tuna and salmon in a can, or a tube, and probably a packet...so Ive never searched it out. Quit picking on me!
 
#16
I had salmon crab cakes at a fancy pants restaurant a few weeks back. Awesome combination. I'll have to try this rendition, I'm always trying to sneak healthy food into my hubby's lunch. Hopefully he won't notice it isn't fried.
 

snafu

Big Time BS'er
#17
angie said:
I had salmon crab cakes at a fancy pants restaurant a few weeks back. Awesome combination. I'll have to try this rendition, I'm always trying to sneak healthy food into my hubby's lunch. Hopefully he won't notice it isn't fried.
Be leery of the fake crab. Pollock is nothing even close to real crab!!
 

RoyalOrleans

I Am Not the Fine Man You Take Me For
#19
snafu said:
Be leery of the fake crab. Pollock is nothing even close to real crab!!
At the grocery store, it's real easy to tell the difference between imitation crab meat and actual crab meat.

First of all, the package's label will tell you that it is in fact imitation crab meat.

Second, the package's label will tell you what fish was used to make the crab meat. Nine times out of ten, it's going to be pollock, but I have also seen cod.

Third and final, imitation crab meat looks more like crab meat than actual crab meat.
 
#20
RoyalOrleans said:
At the grocery store, it's real easy to tell the difference between imitation crab meat and actual crab meat.

First of all, the package's label will tell you that it is in fact imitation crab meat.

Second, the package's label will tell you what fish was used to make the crab meat. Nine times out of ten, it's going to be pollock, but I have also seen cod.

Third and final, imitation crab meat looks more like crab meat than actual crab meat.
You seem to know an awful lot about crabs.